Aloisi a hit at Regional Challenge Cup

100 coaches from right around regional Victoria had the chance to learn from a pro as Melbourne Heart FC Head Coach and Socceroo legend John Aloisi presented a Coach the Coach session at the Regional Challenge Cup in Bendigo on Saturday.

100 coaches from right around regional Victoria had the chance to learn from a pro as Melbourne Heart FC Head Coach and Socceroo legend John Aloisi presented a Coach the Coach session at the Regional Challenge Cup in Bendigo on Saturday.

Aloisi discussed the Heart style of play which features very attacking-minded full backs and high pressure on the opposition when Heart are not in possession before opening up to the floor for questions about motivating players, teaching them to understand their positioning and how to ensure they are competitive when required.

Aloisi said that he was pleased to see so many coaches interested in education.

“It-s OK for me to stand up here and talk, but you want to hear their feedback too. I really enjoy it when they ask questions,” said Aloisi.

“You can never stop learning and improving no matter who you are. I-m the same, I love listening to people that have coached at all levels.”

Moama Echuca Border Raiders and Loddon Mallee Lightning Victorian Champions League coach Darryl Brown praised Aloisi, Melbourne Heart and FFV for putting on the session.

“To have an opportunity to access information from someone of the calibre of John Aloisi is fantastic and for him to come out to the country to actually take the time I think is absolutely commendable,” said Brown.

“For FFV to organise something like this for us is fantastic, I loved it.

“I think 4-3-3 is a great formation and we play it in the Victorian Champions League. I-m very happy that John Aloisi is going to push it at Heart because in my opinion it-s the future of Australian football.”

Aloisi also noted the importance of representative tournaments such as the Regional Challenge Cup, which attracts more than 500 junior players from regional Victoria, as not only is it fun for the kids, but it aids development as well.

"They are very important (for development) because when you get the different regions from the country playing each other, they can see where they are at,” said Aloisi.

“I think the most important thing is just to keep on enjoying the game, that-s what we are all in it for. It-s not about always knowing everything, it-s just making sure that you pass on your passion about the game to the kids and to whoever you are coaching.”